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RÉAug, Volume 63/2

Paris, 2017, 206 p.
ISBN: 978-2-85121-295-5
Table of contents and Abstracts

Brian M. JENSEN & Clemens WEIDMANN Another Brick to the Augustinian Wall. New texts by Augustine discovered in the Sanctorale of the Lectionarium Placentinum 239-276
Christopher A. JONES The Pseudo-Augustinian Excerpts in Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 389 277-309
Bernard MEUNIER Ni ajouter ni retrancher: une qualification du texte inspiré? 311-326
Álvaro CANCELA CILLERUELO Edición y notas al texto de una homilía beneventana (Madrid, BNE, cod. 194 – CPL 1160a 20, 1997a) 327-347
Chronica Tertullianea et Cyprianea 2016 349-384
Bulletin augustinien pour 2016/2017 et compléments d’années antérieures 385-438
Auteurs des travaux recensés 439-442
Table générale 443-444

Abstracts:

Brian M. JENSEN & Clemens WEIDMANN, «Another Brick to the Augustinian Wall. New texts by Augustine discovered in the Sanctorale of the Lectionarium Placentinum», p. 239-276

The Lectionarium Placentinum contains in its Sanctorale (Piacenza, Bibl. Capitolare 62) two unknown sermons ascribed to Augustine, one of which is assigned to the feast of the four Roman martyrs Basilides, Cyrinus, Nabor and Nazarius (f. 141-143r, inc.: Beati martyres ut securi), the other one on Peter’s walking on the sea (f. 182-182v, inc.: Nullus potest esse securus navigator). In this joint study, we provide a critical edition and examine their authenticity. As a result, the sermon on the martyrs is proved authentic (Augustine, Sermo 335N), the other one certainly spurious. In addition, a previously neglected fragment quoted in Ambrosius Autpertus’ Sermo de Mathia can be assigned to Augustine as well (Augustine, Sermo 112B).

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Christopher A. JONES, «The Pseudo-Augustinian Excerpts in Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 389», p. 277-309

A ninth-century manuscript copied at Freising (now Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6389) contains a series of passages beginning Vide, Alipi mi, ubi tibi uideatur ueritas habitare. The material has at times been regarded as pseudo-Augustinian, but its
content—actually a jumble of excerpts on multiple topics—has never been described or analyzed in detail. The present study takes up a suggestion by François Dolbeau that the passages are of Carolingian origin, and that their invocation of “Alypius” reflects the well-known enthusiasm of Alcuin and his colleagues for literary aliases. Further study of the passages in Clm 6389 confirms the Carolingian character of their source(s). By their content as well as their codicological setting, the extracts show frequent connections to one of Alcuin’s students in particular, Candidus Wizo, and also to the anonymous group of school texts known as the “Munich Passages.” As a further point of interest, the notable reference to “Alypius” in the excerpts is one of several indications that they were, in whole or part, written by the same author who composed the mysterious Carolingian treatise De sole et luna, published for the first time in 2006. The authorship of that text—which is also addressed to “Alypius”—invites reexamination in light of the connections between Candidus Wizo and the excerpts transmitted in Clm 6389. The character of these two sources associated with “Alypius” manifests a more complex type of “pseudo-
Augustinianism” than is typical of early medieval Augustinian pseudepigrapha.

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Bernard MEUNIER, «Ni ajouter ni retrancher: une qualification du texte inspiré?», p. 311-326

The expression ‘neither add nor subtract’ draws the attention of the reader of ancient Christian writers, who encounters it quite often. Borrowed from pagan antiquity, where it has various uses, in Christian texts it takes on a precise meaning related to the Canon and the inspiration of biblical texts; but it is found, from the fourth century onwards, applied to conciliar texts, which shows a conception of inspiration not enclosed within the text, but extended to the reader, the Council having authority to interpret biblical texts.

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Álvaro CANCELA CILLERUELO, «Edición y notas al texto de una homilía beneventana (Madrid, BNE, cod. 194 – CPL 1160a 20, 1997a)», p. 327-347

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 194 is the oldest extant Beneventan homiliary. As an appendix to his detailed study of this codex, Raymond Étaix transcribed a sermon of which this manuscript is the only known witness (CPL 1160a, 18-20). Although Étaix already emended certain faults, some errors remained unsolved. This paper presents a new critical edition including the discussion of the last sentence of the text, now transcribed under ultraviolet light. The text is followed by critical notes in which the corruptions identified by Étaix are corrected; some hitherto unnoticed faults are identified and emended as well.

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